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October 2016 Archives

FMLA protects federal employee rights in Washington, D.C.


Certain life events may lead to a person in Washington, D.C., from being unable to work for a period of time, particularly situations involving pregnancy, childbirth or an extended illness. People should be able to take the time off from work to care for themselves in these situations, without fear of being fired. Some people have employment contracts that address such situations, but is there any protection for those who do not? Actually, federal law has addressed this issue in the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).

SEC combined whistleblower awards top $100 million


Employees in Washington, D.C., need to know that if their employer is engaging in unethical or illegal behavior, they have the right to report such actions to the appropriate authorities without fear of losing their jobs. In fact, the amount of money the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has awarded to whistleblowers has risen above $100 million, with some whistleblowers receiving as much as $30 million.

Firefighter files $2.5 million wrongful termination lawsuit


Sometimes, workers who try to do the right thing by reporting employer misdeeds, are wrongfully fired for doing so. However, when this is the case, it is possible that the employee may have legal recourse. Take, for example, a Washington, D.C., fire captain, who has filed a wrongful termination lawsuit against the district in the amount of $2.5 million. She claims she was wrongfully terminated after being unfairly blamed for a sluggish response, the fire department had to a 2008 fire in an apartment complex in Mount Pleasant. The woman had been a firefighter for 18 years.

Settlement may preferred in some wrongful termination claims


When an employee in Washington, D.C., believes he or she was wrongfully terminated, they may take legal action, via filing a lawsuit against their employer. However, while a successful lawsuit may allow the employee to recover compensation, such as compensatory damages and back pay, there is always the chance that the employee's lawsuit will not succeed, meaning the employee will get nothing. Moreover, in some situations, it is hard to prove one was wrongfully terminated. Therefore, many employees in Washington, D.C., who have filed a wrongful termination lawsuit ultimately decide to settle.

What does it mean to be employed 'at-will' in Washington, D.C.?


Most people in Washington, D.C. who work are employed "at-will." For some, this is true even if there is an employee handbook or an employment contract. Therefore, it is important to understand what this means, particularly when it comes to wrongful termination.

Standing up for victims of workplace discrimination


Some Washington, D.C. residents may have experienced being the target of workplace discrimination at some point. Not only does employment discrimination affect a person's job, but it can also have untold effects on their psyche. It could be so bad as to ultimately cause the employee to resign due to the hostile work environment that the discrimination fostered. In other cases, an employer might discriminate against, or even terminate, an employer who reports the hostile work environment.

Some Wells Fargo whistleblowers experienced retaliation


Wells Fargo is a long-established name in the banking industry, and one expects that it will act with integrity in its business activities. Therefore, Washington D.C. residents may be shocked to hear that the banking giant got caught firing 5,300 workers for reporting that the company was making fictitious bank accounts, false bank card personal identification numbers and false email accounts. The bank was penalized $185 million for these actions.

What steps should you take to stop unethical activities at work?


This blog has covered numerous stories of individuals who blew the whistle on their employer's unlawful activities. It is important to hold Washington, D.C. employers accountable for their actions, and sometimes the only way to do that is to report your employer's acts to the appropriate authorities. Therefore, it is important to know what steps to take, should you find yourself in such a position.

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I have been a litigator for close to 20 years and Alan is most certainly one of the best attorneys I have ever come across.
Mr. Lescht is an excellent Trial Lawyer, He is calm, cool, and collected.
I also appreciated Alan's frankness and his ability to identify what is important and what is not when going through a case like this.
I would highly recommend Alan to anyone who needs an exceptional and incredibly talented Employment Attorney.
Mr. Lescht is an extraordinarily responsive attorney, returning my emails and phone calls within minutes. I would absolutely recommend him to anyone who thinks they may need a lawyer. Definitely incredible work.
I was impressed with his knowledge and professionalism, and I will always be grateful for his guidance.

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