Feds issue ‘first-ever’ social media policy for security clearance determinations

As the Washington Post reports, the Director of National Intelligence has issued a directive that Facebook, Twitter, and other social media platforms will now figure in the government’s investigation of federal employees and would-be employees who are applying (and re-applying) for security clearances.

The Post calls it a “first-ever” policy.

The ‘whole-person’ approach includes looking into social media accounts.

The Post quotes Beth Cobert of the Office of Personnel Management:

“Agencies make security clearance decisions using a ‘whole person’ approach to assessing who is an acceptable security risk. One component of that approach in the 21st century is social media.”

Investigators will look only at info that is ‘readily available.’

Apparently, a key aspect of this new policy is that the government won’t look into everything posted online, nor will it take everything it finds into account in its security clearance determination – though the Post report lacks details as to how this will be policed.

Indeed, some lawmakers are skeptical.

“How will this work?” asked Rep. Gerry Connolly. “How do we flag the serious from the trivia?”

“Alan gave me the information I needed to save my federal career.” – Former client

If you have an issue with your security clearance, consider contacting Alan Lescht & Associates, P.C. Based in Washington, D.C., we regularly represent federal employees facing trouble with security clearances – whether at-risk or suspended/revoked. For more information on our practice, visit this page about security clearances, or call 202-463-6036.