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Posts tagged "Wage and Hour Disputes"

Don’t wait to address wage and hour disputes

Hourly workers in Washington, D.C., covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act are entitled to be paid overtime wages if they work more than 40 hours per work week. Not only does this include time worked, but it also includes being on call or working from home, along with breaks taken for meals and time spent waiting to clock in. Overtime wages must be included in the paycheck in which the overtime was worked. If you worked overtime but were not paid for it, you may want to address the issue sooner rather than later.

Options for employees whose wage and hour rights are violated

If a worker is covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act and they don't believe they are being paid the correct amount by their employer, they may be able to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division. Employees in Washington D.C. do not have to pay anything to file a complaint with the WHD or have the WHD perform an investigation.

Workers in Washington, D.C., may see little growth in wages

Residents of Washington, D.C., may have seen a general improvement in today's economy since the depth of the recession a few years ago. Despite the fact that the economy has bounced back somewhat since then, one study reports that wages earned have not seen a similar improvement.

Experts and politicians weigh in on federal minimum wage

Raising the federal minimum wage has been the focus of many protests these days. Our readers in Washington, D.C., may have seen many of these protests and rallies on television or in newspapers. Some activists are calling for the federal minimum wage to be raised as high as $15 per hour. Currently, the federal minimum wage is $7.25, although in Washington, D.C., it is higher.

Distinction between employee and contractor is not always clear

The proper classification of workers is an essential component of doing business in Washington, D.C. The difference between being classified as an employee or an independent contractor can affect a worker's pay, his or her freedom to his or her job and his or her eligibility for benefits. As many workers in Washington, D.C., can attest, however, the line between independent contractor and employee is not always so clear cut these days.

Don't be afraid to seek help for your unpaid overtime case

Hourly employees in Washington, D.C., whether they are maintenance workers, laborers, nurses or anyone in between, deserve to be appropriately compensated for their professional and dedicated work efforts. Unfortunately, unscrupulous employers sometimes try to thwart the system and avoid paying their hourly employees appropriately for overtime work.

What activities can a Washington D.C. worker be paid for?

Workers in Washington, D.C., may be familiar with the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA.) This Act lays out federal mandates regarding the minimum wage a worker must be paid and the compensation a worker should receive if he or she works overtime. However, Washington, D.C., residents may be interested in learning more about what types of activities at work are compensable.

Worker in Washington, D.C., alleges misclassification

The difference between an independent contractor and an employee in Washington, D.C., is crucial. In general, companies are not required to provide independent contractors with the same benefits they offer to employees. However, this can present difficult issues when a worker challenges a classification as an independent contractor. Take, for example, the story of one worker who was denied benefits for being classified as an independent contractor rather than as a government employee, and was ultimately let go from her job.

Understanding current wage and hour laws

Employment is an important part of the lives of most people, which is why ensuring workers understand their rights is important. The minimum wage in Washington, D.C. recently increased to $10.50 an hour. The recent increase in Washington, D.C.'s minimum wage is part of an overall plan and recent law to increase Washington, D.C.'s minimum wage to $11.50 per hour by 2016. It was estimated that 64,000 workers in Washington, D.C. earn less than $11.50 per hour and were impacted by the recent change. The increase makes Washington, D.C.'s minimum wage amongst the highest in the country.

How does federal law address DC child labor?

For better or worse, most people in Washington, D.C., remember getting their first job. It is a right of passage for many. However, it is important to remember that the federal Fair Labor Standards Act has child labor law provisions that dictate the hours and types of work a minor can perform.

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