New law affords greater whistleblower protections to federal employees

Recently, a new law went into effect that better protects federal whistleblowers from retaliation by their supervisors. The Dr. Chris Kirkpatrick Whistleblower Protection Act of 2017, unanimously passed by both chambers of Congress, aims to deter supervisors from punishing federal employees for exposing agency mismanagement. It also includes some agency-specific requirements to better protect Veterans Affairs employees’ privacy interests.

How will the law protect federal whistleblowers?

Many federal employees who disclose wrongdoing suffer the indignity of being targeted by their managers after speaking out about governmental waste, fraud, and abuse. Such was the case of Dr. Chris Kirkpatrick, a Department of Veterans Affairs psychologist who sadly committed suicide the same day he was fired in retaliation for whistleblowing. Dr. Kirkpatrick raised concerns about the over-prescription of opioids to veterans at a VA facility that was known to patients as “Candy Land.” Until last week, there was a lack of consequences for individuals engaging in such retaliation, and managers were even rewarded with bonuses and raises for harassing whistleblowers.

The new law, named after Mr. Kirkpatrick, requires that agencies train managers how to handle whistleblower complaints and provide a disciplinary process for retaliating managers.

The law also requires that the VA develop a plan to prevent unauthorized access to employees’ medical records, and it must reach out to employees to make them more aware of available mental health services.

Are you a federal whistleblower?

If you have questions about federal whistleblower protections or retaliation, contact Alan Lescht and Associates today.  Call us at (202) 463-6036, or email us. We offer strategic and results-driven legal services to federal government employees around the world.