National origin discrimination common against immigrant workers

If you have moved to the U.S. for work, or are considering immigrating to the country to pursue a job, you may have an array of uncertainties, stressors and immigrations issues to deal with. In Washington, D.C., and all over the country, there are many opportunities that can help immigrants further their lives. Unfortunately, some of them experience national origin discrimination or other types of discrimination in the workplace. It is vital for you to recognize and take action if you ever experience discrimination yourself.

According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, employment immigrants may be discriminated against at work in many different ways. For example, they may be unlawfully discriminated against as a result of their national origin or the fact that they associate with people who are part of a certain national origin group. National origin discrimination includes treating employees unfairly because of their citizenship status, the place their ancestors were born, the way they dress or look and their accent.

Discrimination rears its head in diverse ways in work spaces all over the nation. From the loss of a job to the rejection of a perfectly-qualified job applicant, victims of discrimination may have their lives thrown into chaos. If you think that your employer may have broken the law by treating you differently based upon these reasons or other factors (such as your gender), you should evaluate your rights as an employee and make sure that they are held responsible for their actions.

This article was put together for general informational purposes and is not legal advice. Contact Alan Lescht and Associates today if you believe you have been subjected to national origin discrimination.

EEOC says parental status discrimination is illegal under executive order

father with baby working on computer

Many people are aware of the prevalence of discrimination based on age, race or religious beliefs. However, workers are subjected to many other types of discrimination, such as parental status discrimination. If you think that you have been discriminated against based on your parental status, you should consider your options.

EEOC says Executive Order 13152 prohibits parental status discrimination

According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Executive Order 13152 prohibits parental status discrimination. The EEOC does not include parental status discrimination as a covered basis when enforcing discrimination laws. However, this form of discrimination may constitute disability or sex discrimination, depending on what happened. Additionally, it is illegal for the federal government to discriminate against employees and job applicants on the basis of parental status.

If you have children discrimination based on your parental status can be especially troubling. Whether your hours were cut, you were denied a job, or you were fired because of your parental responsibilities, discrimination is financially and emotionally draining. If your employer violated your rights, you can hold your employer accountable.

Remember, this post is not offered as an alternative to legal advice. Contact Alan Lescht and Associates if you think you have been discriminated against because you are a parent.

Tip sharing: Minimum wage still required for tipped employees

Many workers rely on tips to make a living. Wait staff, bartenders, baristas, hair stylists, and cleaning staff are just some examples of employees who rely on tips.

One common practice in industries where tipping is the norm is tip sharing. Tip sharing involves pooling tipped employees’ earnings and dividing them among employees. The tips may be divided among tip-receiving employees and other employees such as dishwashers, bussers, cooks, and others who don’t commonly receive tips themselves.

Most states allow for tip sharing, but there are certain rules and limitations that apply. Here are two important things to remember:

  • Minimum wage requirements: Tip-earning employees are only required to place tips in a pool that exceed minimum wage. Employees are not required to share tips if their total earnings equal less than minimum wage.
  • Employers excluded: Employers cannot take part in tip sharing. Tip sharing is only for employees who receive tips – not those who employ them.

When an employer takes tips from a tip pool, or when a tipped employee is earning less than minimum wage, it may be time to speak to an employment law attorney about what is happening.

Although tip pooling is legal in many states, employers must follow the law. When they don’t, they can be held accountable.

Talk to an attorney today: Call Alan Lescht & Associates, P.C., at 202-463-6036 for answers to your questions about tip sharing – and to learn what to do if your employer is violating the law.