Are federal workers just faceless bureaucrats?

“Federal employees support our troops stateside and abroad, fight crime and terrorism and protect our borders. They combat forest fires, inspect our roads and bridges and ensure our aviation system is the safest in the world. They guard and enhance our national parks and lands, guarantee seniors receive their Social Security benefits and process and deliver mail to every address in every type of weather.”

The answer to the question posed in the title of this post is an emphatic “No!”

Kori Keller, in an opinion published on The Hill, laments President Trump’s executive order that put a hiring freeze on federal workers. We’ve covered this in our handy infographic on the hiring freeze, but Keller makes a few interesting points, such as that federal workers represent only 1.9 percent of the national workforce. And, contrary to Trump’s rhetoric about “draining the swamp,” these 1.9 percent of federal workers aren’t just in D.C. – they’re all over the country performing vital functions.

Think mail carriers and forest rangers and firefighters. It’s not “just” those who work in office settings (which, by the way, is also the setting of millions of Americans working in the private sector).

As we wrote on our infographic post (see link above), there could be many unintended consequences to federal employees, even those who still have jobs, which brings us to the next point in this post.

At-will employment in the federal sector?

If this executive order was the first step in the Trump administration’s efforts to “drain the swamp,” you’ll now find in the National Review a call to make all federal employees fire-able. “There shouldn’t be a permanent bureaucracy that can thwart the will of a president,” Grant Starrett argues. “Congress should pass a law to make all federal employees serve at will – just like Americans in the private sector.”

In his article, Starrett makes lots of references to faceless “bureaucrats,” as though they weren’t those who Keller defends. It’s one opinion against another, but when it comes to treating people with dignity, and not assuming they’re part of a swamp, Keller’s opinion and others like it should win out every time.

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