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May 2016 Archives

Don’t wait to address wage and hour disputes

Hourly workers in Washington, D.C., covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act are entitled to be paid overtime wages if they work more than 40 hours per work week. Not only does this include time worked, but it also includes being on call or working from home, along with breaks taken for meals and time spent waiting to clock in. Overtime wages must be included in the paycheck in which the overtime was worked. If you worked overtime but were not paid for it, you may want to address the issue sooner rather than later.

Obama Administration unveils major changes to overtime laws

The Department of Labor formally announced a substantial change to federal overtime regulations. Specifically, the overtime threshold for employees in professional, administrative and management roles will increase from $23,660 to $47,476. This news was formally announced by Vice President Joe Biden, Labor Secretary Thomas Perez and Senator Sherrod Brown (D.-Ohio). The increase is expected to go into effect on December 1, 2016, barring Congressional action.

Options for employees whose wage and hour rights are violated

If a worker is covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act and they don't believe they are being paid the correct amount by their employer, they may be able to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division. Employees in Washington D.C. do not have to pay anything to file a complaint with the WHD or have the WHD perform an investigation.

Can you be fired for refusing to take your employer's flu shot?

nurse with needle.jpgIf you worked at Mission Hospital in North Carolina, the answer is yes - for now, at least. At least three employees at that hospital were terminated for refusing to take flu shots. According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the employees refused based on their religious beliefs.

TSA whistleblowers testify in front of congress

This past spring we wrote about a TSA agent who alleged retaliation following reports he made regarding issues with security at the airport he worked. Security matters are only one of multiple illegal or detrimental things that TSA employees might report. This is illustrated in the recent testimony three employees provided to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. The employees testified to a wide variety of problems.

Is sexual orientation workplace discrimination on the rise?

Workplace discrimination can take many forms. Many people in Washington, D.C., may already be aware that it is illegal to discriminate against workers based on their race, gender, religion or national origin. However, a type of employment discrimination that is receiving more awareness these days is discrimination based on sexual orientation. This is especially serious as more lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals are open about their sexual orientation.

How will criminal allegations impact my security clearance?

Security clearance is vital for many federal employees. Losing security clearance can effectively end a person's career in government service. For job applicants, the denial of security clearance will prevent someone from starting a government career.

Gender identity and sexual orientation discrimination cases filed

Where federal employment matters are concerned, protections for discrimination based on gender identity and sexual orientation, have been slow to take hold. While laws are in place to protect federal employees from discrimination based on a variety of reasons, it wasn’t until last year that people working for federal contractors and subcontractors were provided those protections. Those protections came not from a new law, but in the form of an Executive Order from the president of the United States.

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I have been a litigator for close to 20 years and Alan is most certainly one of the best attorneys I have ever come across.
Mr. Lescht is an excellent Trial Lawyer, He is calm, cool, and collected.
I also appreciated Alan's frankness and his ability to identify what is important and what is not when going through a case like this.
I would highly recommend Alan to anyone who needs an exceptional and incredibly talented Employment Attorney.
Mr. Lescht is an extraordinarily responsive attorney, returning my emails and phone calls within minutes. I would absolutely recommend him to anyone who thinks they may need a lawyer. Definitely incredible work.
I was impressed with his knowledge and professionalism, and I will always be grateful for his guidance.

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